Save Hours of Work With InDesign

Save Hours of Work With InDesign

How to Save Hours of Work With InDesign Anytime you can create a massive project in a fraction of the time, you’ll come out looking and feeling like a hero. Productivity can make and save businesses tons of money, and it can get you out of monotonous, repetitive tasks. That’s where InDesign comes in. Let’s say, as an example, you have an event where you will have 2000 people attending, and each person needs a name badge, showing their name, what store they are from, and their city and state. While this isn’t a lot of information, it is when you have to do it for 2000 people. If you can get the attendee list as an excel spreadsheet, then you’re in luck. You can take that spreadsheet, a set of graphics, and use InDesign to merge it all together into one large document. The amazing part is that you can do this in a matter of minutes. That’s right, I said minutes. With a rarely-mentioned feature called Data Merge, you can bring your graphics into an InDesign document, and you can set up your text fields where each set of information will go. Then, you match the columns of your excel spreadsheet with the fields you’ve placed on your document. Watch the video below to see how all of this works. You’ll be saving hours of work in no time. What do you think about Data Merge? Did you have any trouble using Data Merge to compile all of your information? The beauty about Data Merge is that the interface that comes up allows you to preview how...
InDesign: Different Corner Styles

InDesign: Different Corner Styles

Corner Styles in InDesign In Indesign, in the top menu bar, you can change the corner style from the traditional squared corners, to round, inset, etc. The problem is, if you want one or all of the corners to be different, there isn’t a way to do it from here. If you go to Object > Corner Options, a dialog box comes up where you can edit the corner styles. By default, it is set to change all 4 corners at once, and to the same style. Simply uncheck the chain link in the center, and now you can change each corner shape individually. For example, you could have 3 squared corners and one round, or if you wanted a tab-style box, you could make 2 corners round and the other two square. The other neat thing about this menu is that you can change the size of the corner style individually as well, giving you more shape flexibility. If you click on the drop down menu whose picture looks like a corner, you have a myriad of options for different corner styles. The default is rounded, but you can have none, fancy, bevel, inset, and inverse rounded. You can also apply different styles to different corners, so the options are pretty flexible. This breaks the mold of the traditional box and gives you a few more creative options, so you won’t have to settle for only boxes or rectangular shapes. Below is a green text box with different corner options applied to it: Rounded Inverse Rounded Inset Bevel Fancy Conclusion Breaking the mold in InDesign isn’t difficult if...

Quiktip: Grids in Indesign

You can set up a good grid from the start of a new document in Indesign. When the New Document pops up, you can set the number of columns in your document. I tend to use either 3 or 5 columns. You can use as many as you want. I tend to try to keep it simple and to the point. This is a great base for setting up your document to be clean and well organized. You can have an image take up 2 columns, while you could have 2 columns of text under it. Then, the other 3 columns could have objects aligned to them, or to fit those constraints. The grid will help you to align your different elements and keep the document clean and structured. The example shown uses the default margins, but if you want the grid to span the entire size of the document for bleed purposes, then simple set the margins to...

Automate a Large Project with InDesign and Data Merge

This tutorial will definitely come in handy for someone that has to create dozens, hundreds, or more of names badges, ID cards, business cards, or anything else that would have the same graphics, but different information on each one. I had a project where a company had a huge trade show, and I had to make around 2500 full color name badges for them. Instead of spending weeks on this, I was able to complete it in an hour and print it within a day. First, you will need to gather your project pieces. You will need to create your background graphics, logo, and anything else that will be repeated on each name badge. Open a new InDesign document and place the graphics how you would like them, and to the specific size that you need. Create these graphics in the top left of the document. You will only need to create these one time. Now comes the important part. I had the company send me the list of the attendees in an Excel spreadsheet. One column will have the names of the attendees, and each additional column would have any additional information separated into individual columns. For example, this company had customer numbers, the company name, and the city and state as the additional information. So you would have a column for their name, a column for their customer number, a column for their n name, a column for their city, and a column for their state. Next, if they have not named the columns, you will need to create a header at the top of each column,...

How to Design a Business Card

A reader adamantly requested that I create this tutorial, so I am going to run through the basics of creating your own business card. First, you need to gather all of the information that you need for your card. You will need your company logo, your name, your position, phone number, fax number, cell phone number, e-mail, web site address, and a list of your services. Some of these may be interchangeable or you may have some info that you need to add for your business. You can work in RGB mode, but you will need to convert to CMYK at least when you are done, so that you will have a good idea of how it looks when it is printed. Sizing A normal business card is 3.5 inches wide by two inches tall. in printing, if you want a color to bleed to the edge, then you need to create your design with an additional  1/8″ of a margin on all 4 sides. Bleed is when the color of something goes all the way to the edge. If you don’t compensate for this, then instead of color, then you may get white instead. The extra 1/8 of an inch is so that when the business cards are cut, that there is a safe zone so the color will go all the way to the end. Paper shifts slightly inside of the printing press, so every single page of a print run may not be exactly in the same spot. You add the 1/8 of an inch on each side to compensate for this. When using an online...